Getting it together with Level 7…

This morning the Level 7 guys n gals came into our lowly space to join in with our critique. I love it when we all get together, sadly it doesn’t happen enough. Our group was rather low on numbers as three of the students were absent, (there are 57 varieties of bug going around at the moment), but it was still very cool.

I went for a cold read and the feedback was really good. Most of the group got the anthropomorphic angle, and none of them mentioned Little Red Riding Hood! I was pleased about that, as it means that my own story is coming through now. I had some interesting discussions about theorists too. I hope to have further chats with the 2 students from Level 7 particularly, as we had lots in common. My favourite comment from a Level 7 student was:

Oh my God, I wish I had a mind that worked like yours

I do feel blessed to have such a quirky outlook on life, I have to admit. But then how could I be any other way? It would be enlightening to swap minds with someone else for a day though, imagine that!! Anyway back to the critique…

All of the group loved my book: Wolves Are People Too, which gave me a buzz. I am always amazed when people enjoy and get my art, especially something like a book, which has to work on many levels. This book may not end up being part of my final work for this project, but I am carrying on with the theme next year and I may produce a series of books. I was thinking along the lines of picture books for bigger people.

No suggestions of improvement were out forward, so I will carry on and have more faith in myself, my ideas and my odd mind!

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Discovering the Joys of Baklava…

This morning was one of the best Studio experiences to date imho. We were asked to critique the Level 7 Studio students work, and I had some great students in my group.

I saw a very cool video about the absurdity of everyday life, which I totally get, it was cool to see someone create a film that is a reflection of exactly how I see daily life myself. One big splash of fast moving colours, shapes, light and shadow.

The movie that followed was the antithesis of the previous one. We were treated to a journey across a mellow sea, followed by the most gorgeous filming of baklava being made. Layer after layer of filo, butter and honey poured and brushed over and over. The green of the pistachio’s crumbled on. It was like watching a bed being made in some ways with the billowing of the sheets. But best of all, we got to sit on a rug of mixed origins and eat the most incredible baklava. I have tasted this very sweet dish before, in several countries in Europe, and have never liked it, but the baklava that Jesse made… oh my it was perfect and not too sweet at all.

Sadly I had to forego the rest of the critique for a lecture, but what a treat it was to spend time with the year 7 guys n gals. It was very inspiring and also comforting to know that they too struggle with theory etc. But I loved their confidence, their faith in themselves and their work. We can all have that, we are all human, and we are artists.

The critique session was very valuable for me. It was purely student led without tutor input, and I feel this was the best critique I have had so far. Critique is about the students and what they need from it, and today that worked very well. Timing was great, everyone  who wanted got to have their say and best of all we got to hear the artist speak about their work which there is often not time for. I just love being with other artists or writers, more than anything I think!

Now I need to get Jesse’s baklava recipe! Apparently there are 40 sheets of filo in some recipes… can’t see me making one of those, I am not much of a baker, but this well, it is a form of meditation.

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Image retrieved on 25/8/14 from:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/michael-symon/baklava-recipe.html